Why Women Should Wear Heels

Growing up in the Lindy scene I have heard so many times how women should wear heels because that’s what women are suppose to do. We are women and women wear heels. Now I loved that traditional ideal but I never could get past the FEELING that being in heels gave me. Every attempt I had made to wear heels I felt off balanced; unstable; and constricted in my movement. I loved the idea of heels but came to the conclusion they were not for me. Since then, I have spoken with many other women who have said the same thing. It wasn’t until about a year ago..maybe even less…that I came to a realization.

Heels did not feel good because they showed me all my flaws.

When I wore heels I felt weak and unstable in them. Why? because I hadn’t figured out yet how to put my body in strong enough positions that let me be stable. I felt constricted. Why? because I let the idea of being in heels freak me out, causing so much tension in my body I couldn’t move with ease like I can in the comfort of my Keds.

So the reason I wear heels? Because they help keep me in check. I feel like I become a better and stronger dancer when I wear them. Wearing tennis shoes for a long period of time actually cause me to develop bad habits. I’m an not saying you should throw away all your tennis shoes! I love giving my feet a break while I’m teaching on my feet all day and  I love being in something with more cushion when I practice ariels. I think there is a time and place for everything. All I am saying is don’t just look at the fact that heels make you look like a classy woman but look at how heels can change your dancing for the better.

And this will take time. I made myself wear heels every social dancing night I could for two months before things started clicking for me. It was a stressful and disappointing time but I stuck with it and am so grateful. For those of you ladies still thinking heels are not for you, I encourage you to take the challenge and spend some time in them. They will not only compliment your vintage dresses much better but they might teach you a few things :)

Next post I will write about all the ways I have made dancing in heels more comfortable!

Stay Tuned!!

Ladies and their heels!

Sara Deckard

Nina Gilkenson

Alice Mei

Sharon Davis

And here is a video of a recent performance Dax and I did at Rusty Frank’s 13th Anniversary at Stompy Jones! I am wearing a pair of Remix shoes that I had sueded the bottom. After this dance I realized my next challenge to overcome is tight skirts!!



60 comments


  • Mike V.

    =)

    I say we learn to dance on the rims of water filled urns… slowly removing the water cup by cup. This will expose our weaknesses, forcing us to overcome our limitations in balance!

    Then we can move on to stilts…

    March 21, 2011
  • Apprendre que les talons hauts apportent encore à la danse, c’est réjouissant.
    En plus de la classe, du style.
    Thank you both of you

    March 21, 2011
  • Miki H.

    …and then there is me…..who needs 4″ + platform heels to feel at her best…..and who is woeful because she can only dance in 1 1/2″ heels…..and whose dance friends will never know that in the “real” world she is “tall” :)…..Miki

    March 22, 2011
  • Fenn

    This is ridiculous. Heels are very damaging to your feet, whether they “improve” your dancing or not. No on should be encouraging women to wear heels as some sort of imaginary training exercise that makes absolutely no sense at all. A woman who is going to spend a considerable amount of time dancing should NOT wear heels as they cause serious damage to your feet, especially the nerves in the balls of your feet and your toes.

    March 22, 2011
    • Damon

      Actually most docs I’ve talked to say you can wear whatever you want as long as they are comfortable for you, not binding, and don’t force you into an unnatural position. Things like Neroma are not linked to high heels, they are linked to poorly fitted shoes. I know three people who have had them and didn’t wear heels. One actually now does wear heels while she is dancing, a pair of dance shoes fitted to her foot which she says are much more comfortable than the flats she used to wear, which *did* give her the neroma.

      3 is hardly a scientific study, but it does back up what the Mayo clinic doctor said.

      March 23, 2011
    • Charlie

      Fenn? As in Fenn Soh of Singapore? I remember dancing with you! You are fantastic! And I can honestly say regardless of heels or flats, as long as the follow is having a great dance, to each their own.

      March 26, 2011
    • Claudia

      Serious damage to your feet? And of course you must be a podiatrist to make such a statement, right? or at least a General Practicioner.

      What a ludicrous statement. THIS GP and life-long dancer completely disagrees with you.

      May 25, 2011
  • Christina

    “altho I guarantee every follow I have seen wear tennis shoes and heels always look better in heels and that should be reason enough”

    Always? Even if her dancing in heels is less stable and less expressive because she is not secure in her balance? Wow. I very much disagree with the schema that a follower looking pretty standing still is more important than how she dances, and I’m kind of offended by the implication otherwise.

    March 22, 2011
    • Dax Hock

      @Christina, If you read carefully what sarah is writing, she says all the girls who wear BOTH, I.E. CAN and regularly wear both, like the girls in the photos. They look better when they are in their heals. Read the full sentence again, Sarah says…

      “All I am saying is don’t just look at the fact that heels make you look like a classy woman (altho I guarantee every follow I have seen wear tennis shoes and heels always look better in heels and that should be reason enough) but look at how heels change your dancing for the better.”

      I don’t think she is referring to women who can NOT dance in heels and are less expressive and unstable while failing at it. I think we can all agree that a person feeling comfortable while dancing is going to be better then just looking good standing still. It sounds more like she is drawing attention to the fact that there is something more, then just looking good, that can be gained by wearing heels.

      “I’m kind of offended by the implication otherwise.?”

      Are offended by the implication that style should be reason enough to do something, or offended cause you are possibly misunderstanding the statement?

      March 22, 2011
      • Claudia

        Dax, people WILL always find a way to feel offended. Specially when their hear the truth. That’s a universally known fact.

        May 25, 2011
    • Christina

      @Dax- I appreciate you taking the time to reply, though I’m unsure why it’s you replying and not Sarah, since she wrote the article?

      But I read the piece again, and I still don’t agree that it’s clear from what’s written that she meant ‘women who regularly dance in both and can dance well in both,’ because *that’s not what she said.* She said “every follow I have seen wear tennis shoes and heels always look better in heels”.

      It’s immediately followed by her talking about how she didn’t like dancing in heels and it “didn’t click,” but she persevered, presumably because always looking better in heels “should be reason enough,” as she stated in the paragraph above.

      So, like I said in my first comment, I’m offended by the implication that how a woman looks is more important than how she dances. Which is why there is a question mark after “always” in my first comment. I appreciate the clarification, but I’d rather hear it from the author.

      March 22, 2011
  • Fenn

    @Dax : “It sounds more like she is drawing attention to the fact that there is something more, then just looking good, that can be gained by wearing heels.”

    Not to mention in your reply, you restate the main idea of this post, which is WRONG. Heels are damaging to your feet and are not appropriate dance shoes.

    March 22, 2011
    • Claudia

      Too bad I’ve found this post this late into the discussion.

      Again, that is a false statement. If anything, flat shoes are more damaging to feet that heels.

      May 25, 2011
  • Beth

    I want to clarify this for myself before I pass all of my judgement – are you arguing purely in favor of heels aesthetically, or are you arguing that there is some physiological reason to dance in heels?

    March 22, 2011
    • @Beth..I am saying that heels not only look great but helped my dancing grow and they are worth trying out to see if they are right for you!

      March 23, 2011
    • Beth

      @Sarah – thanks for your followups and clarification – especially your clarification on what exactly you consider heels. We so often see “heels” in shoes used only in reference to women’s shoes with heels 1.5″ or taller that it’s unexpected to consider any shoe with a heel at all a “heeled” shoe.

      March 23, 2011
  • @Christina. I appreciate your honesty and I can assure you the things Dax say are also on my behalf seeing as we are dance partners and he has been with me every step of the way in my growing process :) To respond and elaborate to what you last commented on. If you read the beginning of my article you will see that I first explain how I didn’t like the feeling of being in them so I tossed them aside even though I was told women should wear heels….THEN the reason I started to try again was because I realized one night that the reason they didn’t feel good was because they showed me all my flaws (i.e. my weaknesses)..and that is why I stuck with it…to experiment and see if I could LEARN something from heels instead of just looking good. AND I DID. Heels have taught me so much. I also state that I wear tennis shoes and that this article was not meant to tell women they should always where heels. This is not a book about heels- it’s me sharing one experience (in one article) as a dancer so that you dancer’s reading it can do what you want with it :)
    One last thing. All heels are NOT bad for you. Maybe you think I mean that “all women should dance in 3inch heels” but that is not what I am saying. Look at all men’s dress shoes..they all have about 1inch heels on them…and they don’t complain about health problems….I believe that almost everyone can find a heeled shoe that is comfortable and healthy to them.

    March 22, 2011
    • Christina

      Hey, Sarah, thank you for taking the time to respond and clarify.

      I totally buy that dancing in a bit of a heel and/or hard leather shoes will highlight balance issues, as I have a pair of leather-soled saddle shoes with maybe a 1″ or 1.25″ full heel (like on men’s dress shoes, where the heel doesn’t narrow at all), and I can definitely tell when I’m being sloppy when I wear them.

      As for my own clarification- I assume you were combining response just because it was easier- but I wasn’t the one saying all heels are bad for you.

      March 24, 2011
  • @Miki Your adorable!

    March 22, 2011
  • Jenny

    “I have heard so many times how women should wear heels because that’s what women are suppose to do. We are women and women wear heels.”
    My first reaction to this is why, who says? But I suppose in your line of work image is very important, so I’ll leave that one there.

    With regards to heels themselves, I have to agree partly with the comments above. The higher your heel is, the more damage it does to your feet, but also other areas, including your back as it changes your whole posture.

    That being said, this is the second piece of advice I’ve seen recently from much better dancers than me that has seemed weird to begin with, and I’m trying the other one, so what the hey? One definition of madness – doing exactly the same thing and expecting a different outcome. So with reservations I will try this, small heels to begin with.

    One quick query, do you think it’s best to try heels first socially, or in a class environment?

    March 22, 2011
    • @Jenny. WOW! great question! hmmm…well what I did was wore heels during the night because thats when I dressed up and during the day I teach so many hours it just seemed better to try out heels at night where I could take a break if I wanted…..However! I think for your case I would try it in the classroom. You won’t be on your feet for as many hours as I am plus its a controlled environment and the leaders will probably take it easy on you…That way it’s less stress for you at night when you wanna not worry so much about your dancing :)

      March 23, 2011
    • Jenny

      Ok, so I’ve just read Fenn’s response, and the Logical one to that, sorry, can’t remember the author for that one. Just wnated to say that I apologise if my post seemed harsh, and i do not want to be associated with Fenn’s comments. I hope the response you’ve got doesn’t stop you from posting your thoughts again in the future.
      If I can find any heels, I’m gonna try them in class tomorrow!

      March 24, 2011
  • Fenn

    It’s a little ridiculous to come back in the comments and amend your main idea to mean “any size heel”. You don’t illustrate that at all in your post.

    Even so, you’re still wrong. ALL heels are bad for you. In essence, forcing yourself to dance on the balls of your feet, as we do, is bad for you. In fact, all of those lindy hoppers putting arch supports in their keds should be putting cushions under the balls of their feet. Our weight is not meant to be pushed forward onto the balls of our feet and doing so is damaging over time.

    The posture require of lindy hop, with a bent knee and raised heel, is damaging to the feet. Adding a heel, no matter how small, that forces your weight forward even more is more damaging to your feet. Encouraging women to wear heels, as if it is some exercise in danceability is ridiculous and irresponsible. Peppering that encouragement with pictures of women in very high and unstable heels is moreso.

    March 22, 2011
    • Mike V.

      Actually Fenn, the natural gait of the human foot is to have the weight centered more forward, on the balls of the feet, especially when rapidly moving The heel first tread is unnatural and enforced by how shoes are engineered.
      Go to a beach, and examine the foot prints of people running in the sand, especially the children, and you can see where feet naturally tend to strike.

      Also, you seem very absolutist in your argument that *ALL* heels are bad for people. It is trivial to disprove your argument simply by the fact that it is absolutist. Therefore, I reject your argument until you can come up with a more meaningful and well researched/thought-out one.

      April 7, 2011
  • Fenn

    I’m going to leave your comments alone now. I’ve just come back to tell you that I wrote a response on my blog.

    http://shortgirlphoto.blogspot.com/2011/03/why-women-shouldnt-wear-heels.html

    March 22, 2011
  • @Fenn. I respect your opinion. I’m sorry you find my actions rediculous. I was only trying to explain to you more of my opinion because it appeared you had assumed I was speaking of a certain height in heels and I was not. I of course will not argue about how healthy or not healthy heels are. The only thing I can say is how much heels helped my dancing. I don’t take that statement back. And it seems in your case you would choose to protect your feet more that to experience the benefits heels MIGHT give you. And that is totally great! I also appreciate you taking your opinions to your own blog, I’d like to keep my site as positive as I can. I will be sure to read your blog to understand more of where you are coming from. Take care in your dancing adventures.

    March 22, 2011
  • MYopinion

    @Fenn I am not as nice as Sarah, and don’t really respect your opinion due to it’s rudeness and lack of any substance, it is merely repetitiveness and attacking with no area to facilitate a worthy (and friendly) debate. Instead, it is a pure attack, so here is my opinion, in a nice way…

    I find it ridiculous how upset you are about this post. Honestly, I don’t think she is trying to persuade every girl to wear heels all the time. What I think she is trying to do is offer her opinion, her experience, and let you take from it what you want. Yes, I see she encourages that girls try it, but she is not forcing anyone to do anything, nor is she stating that her opinion is right, she is simply stating it. Like it was stated elsewhere, dancing in and of itself destroys your body (yes it has its health benefits, but it also has its downsides). Heels look good when dancing and thus sometimes heels (a little damage possibly) is what you have to take. Take care of your body before, after and in between and don’t push yourself, if you do, shame on you for hurting yourself.

    And, are you telling me you have never done anything unhealthy/damaging to your body? Used foil? Drank out of a throw away plastic water bottle? Use hand sanitizer? Jay walked? Have you ever encouraged anyone to partake in any of these activities? Well then you have yourself participated in and encouraged dangerous habit. Yes these may or may not be continuous things you do to damage yourself (or maybe they are?) like dancing if it is your lifestyle, but hey, they are the examples I am using. Honestly, I think you need to let the issue go. Yes you are unhappy that she is encouraging dancing in heels, and you have stated that opinion, but again she is not demanding people do this, she is offering up information and her followers/reader can take it as they choose. Really, get over it.

    March 23, 2011
  • Amanda

    I’m glad you posted this. I feel like I went through the same journey about wearing heels, including the really uncomfortable stage where I felt totally tight all the time because I was so scared of wearing heels. What I eventually learned was that even in heels, I needed to find my center, use my whole foot, and relax. Once I figured that out, my dancing improved immensely, and not just in heels, but also in flats.

    March 23, 2011
    • Michel

      @Amanda

      Thats what I was reading in between the lines, that wearing heals is like a tool to make your dancing better because there is less room for error. So you would have to have a better balance, better understanding where and how to place your feet, etc

      March 23, 2011
  • jeanette

    I don’t think that heels make for bad posture. I think that bad posture is exacerbated by heels. If you want to know how to improve your posture, slip on a pair of heels and they’ll tell you everything you need to know.

    The problem is there either way, but how to fix it becomes obvious with heels on.

    March 23, 2011
  • Christine

    I find this an interesting perspective worth considering. I myself wear both heels and flats in dancing and non-dancing situations. However, there is no denying that wearing heels frequently is damaging to the feet. Sarah is probably too young to have spent time at the podiatrist because of painful bunions. And she probably doesn’t have many friends yet who have severely disfigured feet from a lifetime of wearing heels. It is usually after age 40 that the consequences begin, and many women have to have foot surgeries. A heel (I define a heel as being over 1.5 inches) shifts the weight onto the balls of the feet – even more so if the heel is narrow. A typical shoe also has a wedge shape at the front, which forces the foot into an unnatural position. It is important if you are wearing a heel, that you choose one that allows the ball of your foot to spread out, since that will cause less damage.

    Certain dances can be performed quite easily in heels because the weight is already forward on the balls of the feet (Argentine tango, salsa, and balboa for example). In other dances, the weight is more leveraged between the ball and the heel. This is why most top West Coast Swing dancers don’t wear heels in competition these days. The rear end pokes out a bit more and the weight inevitably shifts forward, destroying the aesthetic of a dance that values a straight back and upright position (at least in its current incarnation). Lindy can look quite good in heels, but it is a rare dancer that can balance on heels when landing from jumps and still look as good as she does in flats. I have no doubt that Sarah is one of those women. But for the rest of us non-professionals, we have to weigh whether attempting to achieve that is worth the damage to our feet in the long run.

    March 23, 2011
  • I love heels! In life and in dancing. I’ve been wearing them for years and will continue to do so. As a lindy hopper, it’s great to be able to switch back and forth comfortably between flats and heels depending on the venue, event, your outfit, or your mood. I like Sarah’s challenge, because wearing heels will definitely highlight any balance issues you may be having. With some practice, those issues can be overcome.

    Nobody is suggesting that we should wear heels to a point where they are damaging our feet. Don’t know why people are freaking out about that.

    March 23, 2011
    • Love you in heels jojo!

      March 24, 2011
    • Claudia

      methinks it is because common sense is the least common of the senses.

      One person says “heels” and then some other person is immediately gonna thing “4 inch heels and add a platform for good measure, type of heels”

      And then -of course, why anyone in their right minds would want to lindyhop in that kind of shoes?

      I think your comment should win an award for the most sensible comment ever!

      May 25, 2011
  • I work with people’s posture/alignment a lot (it’s my job). So that’s the perspective I’m gonna bring this comment from.

    Heels. Not the optimal footwear for human feet.

    Keds. Probably not, either.

    Bare feet. Probably closest. (But oh god, please don’t dance without shoes!)

    People come to see me with all sorts of problems, some of which are exacerbated by their footwear. For example, wearing heels shortens the calf muscles and tendon, as does dancing on your toes all the time.

    This tension can cause, say, heel spurs. Some people are luckier and don’t have problems (or at least not yet).

    We do all sorts of things that damage our bodies. The key is to limit it, and undo that damage as much as possible. Heels are not going to work for some people, and they’re going to be great for others.

    And then there’s most of us in the middle, who are going to make excuses because dancing in heels is hard. (And sometimes painful.)

    I agree that heels can be a tool to improve dancing. Similar to switching between sticky shoes and very slick shoes. The more you challenge yourself, the more you have to adapt.

    Also, here’s a note: sometimes the pain and disfunction you feel in your knees, hips, back, shoulders, or neck starts with a misalignment in the feet. Just something to think about for the people who mostly wear one kind of footwear when dancing.

    March 23, 2011
  • [...] I use it sometimes. See also: Mean Girls sex ed talks.) in response to Sarah Breck’s Why Women Should Wear Heels (zomg they’re pretty) blog [...]

    March 23, 2011
  • Ton

    As a non-dancer, but as an audience observer, the appearance of lengthening of the legs by wearing heels creates a beautiful line. There was a reason Ginger Rogers wore heels and it was not because she was short.

    March 23, 2011
  • Heels still kinda kick my ass. Wearing heels says loud and clear”this is what you’re not good at yet”.I accept your challenge.

    March 24, 2011
  • [...] a post by Sarah Breck on women wearing heels while dancing on the website Dax and herself share at DaxandSarah.com and a response why not to wear heels by Fenn at her blog [...]

    March 24, 2011
  • [...] post is is related to Sarahs post on why ladies should conquer wearing heels. I would like to elaborate based on my personal experience why I believe learning to dance in Hard [...]

    March 24, 2011
  • Katie

    Hey, I posted this article on my facebook after seeing in on the Remix shoes page, and let’s just say it got a mixed response! I was just wondering what bad habits you got from Keds, as one friend asked me that. I definitely see that they could give you some, but I wanted to give her a specific answer.
    Thanks,
    Katie

    March 24, 2011
    • Wow..that is a whole other discussion I would have to do…What I can tell you right now though is that when I wear tennis shoes- I sometimes feel really off in my body but I don’t know why and how to fix it…if I switch to my heels they tend to make whatever the issue was at that moment clearer. And once I recognize the true feeling of whats going on I can usually fix it….That’s not quit along the lines of “what bad habits do I develop with in tennis shoes” but I think its one of the strongest reasons why heels help my dancing.

      March 26, 2011
  • I agree that heels can help you learn to be a better dancer. I have experienced this myself.

    I also agree that many heels can ‘force’ your weight to the ball of your foot, are too narrow through the ball of the foot and force your toes to be squished together. This can cause foot health issues. This is just as common in cute flats that are not properly fit to your foot.

    Folks, calm down please. If experimenting with heel height helps you become a better dancer, great. If you have foot, ankle, knee or back issues stick to a shoe that is right for your body’s health. If you like heels pick ones that fit properly or accept that you will have foot issues when you are older. If you swear by “no heels” then don’t wear them. It’s a matter of what is right for you and your foot and your dance path.

    I prefer a slight heel only when the shoe lets me choose where to place my weight… in the heel, along the entire foot or in the ball of the foot. For me, my Aris Allen
    wedges do the trick. I have no problem landing lifts and throws in them at 49 yrs old.

    Sara, in the video at the end of your post, was that a choreographed routine or social dance? I’m thinking it was social.

    Cheers,

    Kathy from Dallas

    March 25, 2011
  • Claudia

    Hi Sarah,
    wow, I am amazed about the response your article got! I think it is a good thing that you make dancers talk about feet and footwear as feet are one of the most important assets a dancer has. And as Rebecca pointed out, a lot of knee and other problems dancers face come from the feet.
    Regarding to Fenn’s post I wanted to add: I am from a Ballet/Modern Dance/Contemporary Dance background and I agree to Sara’s comment on Fenn’s post that Ballet/Modern and Lindy Hop are two totally different “shoes” with different purposes, focusses and footwork and therefor require different footwear altogether.
    I sometimes dance in heels now (especially since I started Balboa and discovered that dancing Lindy Hop in high heels is not as bad as I initially thought as I usually never wear high heels) but will always have more comfy shoes with me.
    I guess, if people listen to their body carefully they will know what’s comfortable and healthy for them.
    Thanks so much for sharing your experience and making people communicate about important things!

    March 25, 2011
    • Claudia

      Sorry, didn’t mean to say “high heels”, just “heels”… My heels are never very high.

      March 25, 2011
  • Martha Velazquez

    I agree with Sarah, I have been wearing heels for 30 years! It took practice and the willingness to endure the sometimes awkward moments. I always love the look they give me; every dressy outfit I wear looks better in nice heels. But some women can’t wear them b/c their feet already have some kind of small problem, so they just shouldn’t. For those with good feet, however, they really can learn to dance in them and it looks great! I dance in them all the time, so do tango dancers and salsa dancers. Do they hurt, yes, but so do the low shoes after several hours of pounding our feet. Ballerina’s have horrible feet problems, not only from point shoes, but hours of practice and dancing, it’s hard on the feet. The point is whether low or high, get a good, comfortable fit, and change them after a couple of hours. As the years have gone by, I change my once 4 hours of dancing in 3″-4″ heels to just the first two hours of the dance, and then the last couple of hours to lower shoes, usually shoes that are a little wider and even just a lower heel (ie from 3 inch to 2 inch, sometimes even to flat ballet shoes that I add a cushion insert to) it works out great! It’s also good to get a foot massage every now and then, especially after a long week of dancing. So wear what makes you look and feel happy, and be kind to your feet.

    March 25, 2011
    • Oh yes! Dax and I get foot massages several times a week! I should add that to my other post! Thanks!

      March 26, 2011
  • [...] dances should dance in high heels.  Sarah Breck started it all with the oh-so-provocatively titled Why Women Should Wear Heels, and Fenn followed it up with the scathingly worded Why Women SHOULDN’T Wear Heels. There’s now [...]

    March 25, 2011
    • Hey! I appreciate you taking your time to marinate on this post and deciding what your thoughts are about this in a respectable way:)

      March 29, 2011
    • Aren

      Hey, Sarah, thank you for reading it, and for allowing my anonymous comment to be shown. Though I do think the little jackass is kind of a cutie.

      March 29, 2011
  • Nice article, well done, like the angle on the topic (well, not better then my angle looking at gorgeous gams but that’s besides the point). Thank’s Sarah.

    March 29, 2011
  • jf

    Hi Sarah,

    Why did you not wear heels for your Live To Dance routine?

    March 30, 2011
    • I didn’t wear heels because the floor was really bad and Dax’s injury caused us to not be able to practice our routine. I thought it would be safer to wear tennis shoes although it was quit a debate about it! lol. I have never said women should wear heels all the time and this is a wonderful example of that! Thanks!!

      March 30, 2011
  • [...] – can’t say I would have deliberately sought out a clips of Dax and Sarah’s dancing before the heels post but now I’ve watched a couple of their performances. Next time I go workshop I will recognise [...]

    March 31, 2011
  • I happened to find this article after reading Dax’s about sweatpants… agreed with the article and was So surprised by the responses from some people that I felt I needed to write a few words on my own blog. (http://www.ballroomdancething.com/2011/04/to-heel-or-not-to-heel-that-is-question.html)
    For me, it comes down to taking care of your body – if you wear heels make sure you stretch your calves, etc. If you wear shoes that are flat but have no cushioning then make sure you massage the bottom of your feet. Too often it is the shoes that get blamed for the fact that we actually just aren’t using common sense about out own maintenance.

    April 5, 2011
  • Interesting post. After reading the comments and clarifications I have two (possibly redundant) things to say:

    1) I use the ball and arch of my foot when dancing, so being in high heels tends to limit my connection to the floor. It doesn’t put me off balance, but it does make me feel less interesting as a dancer. Maybe to myself, only, maybe to my partners, who knows, but that’s the way that rolls.

    2) Being in low heeled, pretty shoes makes me feel sassy from head to toe, and I feel I can rock it AND have happy feet (pun not *entirely* intended.)

    This year at Lonestar I competed for the first time in years, and I was wearing a dress with keds. I hated the line it created, and when I feel awkward looking, I feel my dance becomes awkward. I ended up doing pretty well in the comp, but I still cringe at the crappy casual keds when I look at the videos.

    The moral of the story for me? Searching out the well-made, proper fitting, low-heeled pretty shoes to dance in. I have started to do this and am happy to have the versatility in footwear. Dancing in high heels? Probably never going to happen for me. Thanks, Sarah for clarifying your point regarding the actual height of the heel. That makes a tremendous difference in your post. 1.5″, yes. I can do that. :)

    April 8, 2011
  • [...] White’s initially innocuous dance analogy earlier this winter.  And then later there was a post about dancing in heels by Sarah Breck that triggered some rather vociferous responses. What intrigues me the most is that the more [...]

    May 12, 2011

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